Bud Brown Chuck Wagon

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    Description: The Bud Brown chuck wagon.  Bud Brown ran a tourist outfit in Sedona in the 1920s.
     

    Francis Valentine "Bud" Brown graduated from Dartmoth College in 1925 and headed west to Phoenix. He initially worked as a cowboy on E.K. Ryder's spread in the south Valley and he began teaching at Flagstaff High School in the late 1920s. Bud and wife Mary Isabelle Fuller moved to Mesa in 1936. When Phoenix North High School opened in 1939, Brown transferred and taught there for the next decade.

    He and his family ran Bud Brown's Barn on Northern Avenue, just east of Seventh Street for many years, serving up heaping portions of Western-style food and music and dancing. The beef, which Bud presided over, was so tender he offered free dinners to anyone who needed a knife to cut it. And when folks asked for the recipe for his for his wife's legendary beans, Brown simply replied, "Hell no. I had to marry the woman to get that recipe. I'm not about to give it away."

    In the late 1940s, Bud and Mary bought a small summer camp in the Groom Creek area near Prescott and renamed it Friendly Pines. Around 1950 Brown retired from teaching to work full time at the Barn and camp. Although the Barn was a huge success, the Browns sold it in 1958 to devote themselves to Friendly Pines.

    He was Uncle Bud to the kids attending the summer camp and his campfire programs were some of the best in the country. He had a great memory, was a good singer and could recite hundreds of poems and songs, from ancient classics to vaudeville ditties around the campfire.

    Accession #: unknown

    Courtesy of Sedona Heritage Museum, Sedona, AZ

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    Francis Valentine "Bud" Brown graduated from Dartmoth College in 1925 and headed west to Phoenix. He initially worked as a cowboy on E.K. Ryder's spread in the south Valley and he began teaching at Flagstaff High School in the late 1920s. Bud and wife Mary Isabelle Fuller moved to Mesa in 1936. When Phoenix North High School opened in 1939, Brown transferred and taught there for the next decade.

    He and his family ran Bud Brown's Barn on Northern Avenue, just east of Seventh Street for many years, serving up heaping portions of Western-style food and music and dancing. The beef, which Bud presided over, was so tender he offered free dinners to anyone who needed a knife to cut it. And when folks asked for the recipe for his for his wife's legendary beans, Brown simply replied, "Hell no. I had to marry the woman to get that recipe. I'm not about to give it away.

    In the late 1940s, Bud and Mary bought a small summer camp in the Groom Creek area near Prescott and renamed it Friendly Pines. Around 1950 Brown retired from teaching to work full time at the Barn and camp. Although the Barn was a huge success, the Browns sold it in 1958 to devote themselves to Friendly Pines.

    He was Uncle Bud to the kids attending the summer camp and his campfire programs were some of the best in the country. He had a great memory, was a good singer and could recite hundreds of poems and songs, from ancient classics to vaudeville ditties around the campfire. edited 08:36, 2 Feb 2013
    Posted 21:27, 30 Jan 2013
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