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    davem
    Last login:
    Oct 31, 2013 3:55 AM
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    Mar 6, 2012
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    Recent Comments (@davem)
    davem on Wagon Teams
    Oct 31, 2013 3:59 AM
    Poverty Flats and Gummers Camp were not able to attend last years event.
    davem on Wagon Teams
    Oct 31, 2013 3:57 AM
    2012 Wagon Teams Competing in the Chandler Chuck Wagon Cook-off Arizona Sharpshooters - Steve Rhoades and Carolyn Ortales, Phoenix Cowgirls Forever - Barbara Kennedy, Desert Hills, AZ Cannon Family - Bopper, Robin and Keith Cannon, Rimrock, AZ Curley Cue Camp - Clint Combs, Tina Stallard, Las Vegas NV E-Z Cattle Company - Rex Dalton, Sonita, AZ Manflo Wagon - Bryan Jones, Nuevo, CA Rockin RR - Russ and Sue Richins, Phoenix Host wagon - Biscuitflats Wagon - Dave McDowell and Kris Kircher, Chandler
    davem on Wagon Teams
    Oct 31, 2013 3:56 AM
    2012 Wagon Teams Competing in the Chandler Chuck Wagon Cook-off Arizona Sharpshooters - Steve Rhoades and Carolyn Ortales, Phoenix Cowgirls Forever - Barbara Kennedy, Desert Hills, AZ Cannon Family - Bopper, Robin and Keith Cannon, Rimrock, AZ Curley Cue Camp - Clint Combs, Tina Stallard, Las Vegas NV E-Z Cattle Company - Rex Dalton, Sonita, AZ Manflo Wagon - Bryan Jones, Nuevo, CA Rockin RR - Russ and Sue Richins, Phoenix Host wagon - Biscuitflats Wagon - Dave McDowell and Kris Kircher, Chandler
    There is a Pep cereal box in several of these photos. Pep was a brand of whole-wheat breakfast cereal produced by the Kellogg Company, and introduced in 1923. Pep was a long-running rival to Wheaties, and also the sponsor of Mutual Radio's Superman radio series. One of Pep's advertising slogans was "the Sunshine cereal". I guess that cowboys may have eaten them too. Then again maybe they just used the empty box.
    "Chuck trucks", trailers and motorized vehicles gradually replaced the horse or mule drawn chuck wagons after the introduction of the Model T Ford. But, many of the rough canyons and ranges of the southwest were not accessible by vehicle and pack mules were used. Horse drawn wagons were used into the 1940's.
    "Chuck trucks", trailers and motorized vehicles gradually replaced the horse or mule drawn chuck wagons after the introduction of the Model T Ford. But, many of the rough canyons and ranges of the southwest were not accessible by vehicle and pack mules were used. Horse drawn wagons were used into the 1940's.
    "Chuck trucks", trailers and motorized vehicles gradually replaced the horse or mule drawn chuck wagons after the introduction of the Model T Ford. But, many of the rough canyons and ranges of the southwest were not accessible by vehicle and pack mules were used. Horse drawn wagons were used into the 1940's.
    "Chuck trucks", trailers and motorized vehicles gradually replaced the horse or mule drawn chuck wagons after the introduction of the Model T Ford. But, many of the rough canyons and ranges of the southwest were not accessible by vehicle and pack mules were used. Horse drawn wagons were used into the 1940's.
    "Chuck trucks", trailers and motorized vehicles gradually replaced the horse or mule drawn chuck wagons after the introduction of the Model T Ford. But, many of the rough canyons and ranges of the southwest were not accessible by vehicle and pack mules were used. Horse drawn wagons were used into the 1940's.
    davem on Bud Brown Chuck Wagon
    Feb 2, 2013 3:36 PM
    Francis Valentine "Bud" Brown graduated from Dartmoth College in 1925 and headed west to Phoenix. He initially worked as a cowboy on E.K. Ryder's spread in the south Valley and he began teaching at Flagstaff High School in the late 1920s. Bud and wife Mary Isabelle Fuller moved to Mesa in 1936. When Phoenix North High School opened in 1939, Brown transferred and taught there for the next decade. He and his family ran Bud Brown's Barn on Northern Avenue, just east of Seventh Street for many years, serving up heaping portions of Western-style food and music and dancing. The beef, which Bud presided over, was so tender he offered free dinners to anyone who needed a knife to cut it. And when folks asked for the recipe for his for his wife's legendary beans, Brown simply replied, "Hell no. I had to marry the woman to get that recipe. I'm not about to give it away. In the late 1940s, Bud and Mary bought a small summer camp in the Groom Creek area near Prescott and renamed it Friendly Pines. Around 1950 Brown retired from teaching to work full time at the Barn and camp. Although the Barn was a huge success, the Browns sold it in 1958 to devote themselves to Friendly Pines. He was Uncle Bud to the kids attending the summer camp and his campfire programs were some of the best in the country. He had a great memory, was a good singer and could recite hundreds of poems and songs, from ancient classics to vaudeville ditties around the campfire.
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